Live A New Life

by / Friday, 10 April 2015 / Published in God is Love

The vows which we take upon ourselves in baptism embrace much.  In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit we are buried in the likeness of Christ’s death and raised in the likeness of His resurrection, and we are to live a new life.  Our life is to be bound up with the life of Christ.  Henceforth the believer is to bear in mind that he is dedicated to God, to Christ, and to the Holy Spirit.  He is to make all worldly considerations secondary to this new relation.  Publicly he has declared that he will no longer live in pride and self-indulgence.

He is no longer to live a careless, indifferent life.  He has made a covenant with God.  He has died to the world.  He is to live to the Lord, to use for Him all his entrusted capabilities, never losing the realization that he bears God’s signature, that he is a subject of Christ’s kingdom, a partaker of the divine nature.  He is to surrender to God all that he is and all that he has, employing all his gifts to His name’s glory.

E. G. White, Testimonies For The Church, vol. 6, pp. 98, 99

Jesus was our example in all things that pertain to life and godliness. He was baptized in Jordan, just as those who come to Him must be baptized.  The heavenly angels were looking with intense interest upon the scene of the Saviour’s baptism, and could the eyes of those who were looking on, have been opened, they would have seen the heavenly host surrounding the Son of God as He bowed on the banks of the Jordan.  The Lord had promised to give John a sign whereby he might know who was the Messiah, and now as Jesus went up out of the water, the promised sign was given; for he saw the heavens opened, and the Spirit of God, like a dove of burnished gold, hovered over the head of Christ, and a voice came from heaven, saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

What does this scene mean to us?  How thoughtlessly we have read the account of the baptism of our Lord, not realizing that its significance was of the greatest importance to us, and that Christ was accepted of the Father in man’s behalf.  As Jesus bowed on the banks of Jordan and offered up His petition, humanity was presented to the Father by Him who had clothed His divinity with humanity.  Jesus offered Himself to the Father in man’s behalf, that those who had been separated from God through sin, might be brought back to God through the merits of the divine Petitioner.  Because of sin the earth had been cut off from heaven, but with His human arm Christ encircles the fallen race, and with His divine arm He grasps the throne of the Infinite, and earth is brought into favor with heaven, and man into communion with his God.  The prayer of Christ in behalf of lost humanity cleaved its way through every shadow that Satan had cast between man and God, and left a clear channel of communication to the very throne of glory.  The gates were left ajar, and heavens were opened, and the Spirit of God, in the form of a dove, encircled the head of Christ, and the voice of God was heard saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

The voice of God was heard in answer to the petition of Christ, and this tells the sinner that his prayer will find a lodgment at the throne of the Father.  The Holy Spirit will be given to those who seek for its power and grace, and will help our infirmities when we would have audience with God. Heaven is open to our petitions, and we are invited to come “boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.”  We are to come in faith, believing that we shall obtain the very things we ask of Him.

E. G. White Comments, SDA Bible Commentary, vol. 5, p. 1078

96 Views

Share This:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

TOP